We’ve heard about megapixels and they often become the chief deciding factor when we choose a camera but what really are they for? And do we really need to get the camera with the greatest number of megapixel?

Here’s an article by Dan Feildman, that reveals to us what megapixels are really for:

http://www.learndigitalphotographynow.com/blog/megapixel-and-printing/

And remember, you don’t necessary have to buy a camera on the market with most number of megapixels!

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Camera Batteries 101

August 2, 2008

Power Sucking Camera Battery Features

Does your camera batteries seem to run out of power awfully quick? I used to have that same problem too but I’ve discovered some tricks you can use to save your battery power!

Here are the three features of digital cameras that suck up your battery life in no time:

LCD Screen: This is by far the most power sucking (haha I just love to use that word) feature in digital cameras. You can turn the screen off to conserve power, however I don’t recommend this because your LCD screen is very useful when you are taking photographs as it enables to determine if you have taken a great shot.

  • LCD Screen: This is by far the most power sucking (haha I just love to use that word huh) feature in digital cameras. You can turn the screen off to conserve power, however I don’t recommend this because your LCD screen is very useful when you are taking photographs as it enables to determine if you have taken a great shot.
  • Flash: Another big power sucker. Try not to use your flash so often.
  • Zooming: Zooming in and out also uses battery power as the motor in your camera is driven. Refrain from ‘zooming’ too much. I recommend staying close to full optical zoom.

Make Your Batteries Last Longer

Given that the two biggest power users on your camera are the LCD screen and Flash, there are indeed ways to reduce the usage of these 2 functions and save your camera power.

If your camera allows you to, reduce the brightness of the screen. This will still allow you to view your photo on your LCD, while using minimal amount of power.

Try to disable your flash when you’re in low light by increasing the light around you. Or increase the “ISO Speed”. Remember, the higher the ISO setting, the less light is needed to record the image.

Other Secrets for Making Your Batteries Last Longer:

  • Most digital cameras have a Power Saving mode. This ’shuts down’ the camera – not switch off – after a period of time without use. Make sure Power Saving mode is on, or simply switch off your camera when you’re not using it.
  • In cold weather, keep your camera and batteries warm in your jacket until you are ready to use them. Cold weather to batteries is like RAID is to bugs!
  • Store batteries in a cool, dry location away from sunlight and other heat sources.
  • Avoid unnecessary playback of your already taken images.
  • If you haven’t used your camera for a while, your rechargeable batteries will have lost some of their charge. Ensure you charge them fully before leaving the house.

Buy a Spare Battery

You can get double the time from of your camera before needing to recharge by using two batteries.

If you don’t need an extra battery all the time, you can have one charging at home when you’re using the other. Then when you get home, swap them.

Never leave your camera behind again because you don’t have a charged battery.

What Kind of Battery Should I Purchase?

You will need to purchase a battery that is compatible with your camera, so I recommend taking your camera’s battery to the shop with you when purchasing so the staff can find another compatible battery.

You don’t need to purchase a battery from the same manufacturer as your camera, although be aware that choosing another brand may void your warranty – check your manual.

Go for a rechargeable Lithium ion battery if possible. These battery types have a greater capacity and longer life than the rechargeable ni-cad batteries and will pay for themselves in a short period of time.

Use the AC Adapter

Most cameras have an adapter to allow you to plug directly into a power point.

If you’re going to be shooting for a long period of time in the one location, a camera plugged into a power point can be very handy.

Note that some cheaper cameras have the plug for an AC adapter, but not the adapter itself.

Gladys Choo

www.TakeFamilyPictures.com